Category Archives: Historical linguistics

Jonas on the morphosyntax of the verb “think” from a comparative and diachronic perspective

During her visit to Australia, Dianne Jonas is giving two presentations on  her recent work on the diachronic change of the argument pattern of the verb think in a number of Germanic languages. On February 27, she gave a talk at the unversity of Melbourne on “Thinking comparatively and diachronically. A case study on the verb think“.  March 6, she will give a talk on “Morphosyntactic change – a case study of the verb think” at Monash university (Clayton campus).

Continue reading Jonas on the morphosyntax of the verb “think” from a comparative and diachronic perspective

Models of Language Change

by Assif Am-David, Frankfurt a.M.

For the last 150 years the ultimate representation of language change has been the family tree model. I shall start by explaining what the family tree model is. I shall pursue in presenting some major schools raising contention against this model. Finally, I shall discuss these critical voices in light of the progress in historical linguistics. Continue reading Models of Language Change

Language Change

by Assif Am-David, Frankfurt a.M.

One of the most intriguing and widely studied topics in linguistics is the nature of language change. It is a well-known fact that natural languages of all types keep changing constantly. Language change can be studied from several angles: One can reconstruct extinct languages, classify languages to language families, recognise trends in lexical and grammatical changes and draw historical conclusions from language change. However, perhaps the most prominent question regarding language change is why it happens in the first place. Continue reading Language Change