All posts by Frank

Gerald Penn visiting (again)

Gerald Penn from the University of Toronto came back to Frankfurt this summer for an entire month of intense implementation work on CLLRS, the constraint language that gives a computational interpretation to Lexical Resource Semantics (LRS). LRS is the  semantic framework that we use in teaching introductory semantics, and it is developed actively in various ongoing research projects. Continue reading Gerald Penn visiting (again)

Tilman Höhle’s Gesammelte Schriften

Earlier this week the open access publisher Language Science Press published a complete collection of papers by Tilman Höhle, edited by Stefan Müller, Marga Reis and Frank Richter. Tilman Höhle wrote a significant number of highly influential papers on German grammar (and on Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar) from the early 80s until the beginning of the millenium. Among the topics covered are Continue reading Tilman Höhle’s Gesammelte Schriften

Gerald Penn Visits IEAS

Gerald Penn from the University of Toronto is staying at IEAS for three weeks to work with Gert Webelhuth, Manfred Sailer, Niko Schenk, and Frank Richter on several extensions of the TRALE grammar implementation system.

TRALE is at the heart of various long-term projects we are pursuing at the linguistics department. Most visibly, it provides the underlying software platform for the online grammars which Gert Webelhuth uses throughout his syntax courses. In order to make the graphical user interface of the online grammars in those classes more intuitive, Continue reading Gerald Penn Visits IEAS

Semantic Fiction

The murder of Richard Montague, disruptive innovator in the thriving field of formal semantics (as he might be called by advertising companies today), is an unsolved police case. His theories of natural language, and their many successors, are of course still taught today, as any student in our semantics courses can tell you. For taking some time off from the intellectual effort that it takes to come to grips with logical languages, without leaving the topic altogether, there is an exciting option: A few years ago, Aifric Campbell published a murder mystery, The Semantics of Murder, which is constructed around the real-world events surrounding the life of Richard Montague. Here’s your exceptional chance to enjoy a structural analysis of a higher-order quantificational formula in a relaxing environment – as a student of semantics you might want to check out page 58 of the 2008 softcover edition right away!

Links

Dianne Jonas in Iceland

Dianne Jonas is again heading north to Iceland, where she will be giving a talk on `The Morphosyntax of the verb tykja in Faroese – a Diachronic and Comparative Perspective’. Her presentation is part of a meeting organized by Háskóla Íslands og Fróðskaparseturs í
Færeyjum (University of Iceland and University of the Faroe Islands).

Paper on Automatic Reasoning

Many tests of semantic properties that linguists use in their everyday life rely on reasoning. For example, if you know that all space aliens love chocolate, and you learn that Mary is a space alien, then you also know that Mary loves chocolate. This does not only tell you something important about space aliens, on closer inspection and after some serious linguistic analyzing it also reveals certain properties of the meaning of the determiner all. Continue reading Paper on Automatic Reasoning